Andrea Clementson-Stinson posts open letter 'to all fans and listeners of Drexciya'

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    Mon, 17 May 2021, 11:04
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    Resident Advisor
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  • "Outside of the music there is no other product under the name of Drexciya."
  • Andrea Clementson-Stinson posts open letter 'to all fans and listeners of Drexciya' image
  • Andrea Clementson-Stinson, the wife of the late Drexciya member James Stinson, has published an open letter "to all fans and listeners of Drexciya." Posted on the Drexciya Research Lab blog on May 11th, the letter responds to the use of the Drexciyan mythos and imagery outside of the context of the original Drexciya releases, stating "no one person is capable of relaying or expanding on the myth/story of Drexciya other than its creators" and "Outside of the music there is no other product under the name of Drexciya." Recent years have seen a marked rise in exhibitions, events, films, lectures, tribute records, merchandise and articles exploring and reproducing the lore created in the Detroit duo's releases. (Resident Advisor has contributed to this trend with news and a film)."There were two agents of Drexciya and if it does not come from the two agents then please know that it is not legitimate," says Clementson-Stinson. Clementson-Stinson also claims that "Drexciya's music was never supposed to be associated with race or a race war… To those who seek to put a divide, we are asking you to stop / cease and desist." The liner notes to 1997's The Quest includes four maps labelled "The Slave Trade (1655-1867)," "Migration Route Of Rural Blacks To Northern Cities (1930s-1940s)," "Techno Leaves Detroit, Spreads Worldwide (1988)" and "The Journey Home (Future)," which depicts a return migration from North, Central and South America to West Africa. Drexciyans were portrayed as "water breathing, aquatically mutated descendants" of "pregnant America-bound African slaves" thrown overboard during the Atlantic crossing. Read the full post.