86 percent of Black artists in the UK experience barriers to progression, says new survey

  • Published
    Wed, 13 Oct 2021, 10:30
  • Words
    Sean Beeby
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  • Led by Black Lives In Music, the damning report lays bare the systemic racism in the music industry.
  • 86 percent of Black artists in the UK experience barriers to progression, says new survey image
  • UK organisation Black Lives In Music (BLIM) has published a damning report on racism and discrimination in the modern music industry. 2000 people responded to the survey, which launched in March. Those surveyed reported a range of discriminatory acts, barriers to progression based on their ethnicity, income inequalities and more. Here are some key findings:
    • 86 percent of all Black music creators agree that there are barriers to progression. This rises to 89 percent for Black women and 91 percent for Black creators who are disabled. • 88 percent of all Black music professionals agree that there are barriers to progression. • Three in five (63 percent) Black music creators have experienced direct or indirect racism in the music industry, and more (71 percent) have experienced racial micro-aggressions. • 35 percent of all Black music creators have felt the need to change their appearance because of their race or ethnicity, rising to 43 percent for Black women. • 38 percent of Black music professionals earn 100 percent of their income from music compared to 69 percent of white music professionals.
    Black artists also reported being granted less studio time than their white counterparts, refused event performance opportunities, being told to change the type of music they create, or being typecast as "urban artists" regardless of their musical intentions. "This is a first-of-its-kind report which holds a mirror up to the UK music industry showing what it actually looks like," says BLIM CEO Charisse Beaumont. "The report highlights racist culture and behaviours in the workplace, financial barriers and lack of investment in Black music creators, and industry professionals unable to reach their career goals." Read the full report here. Photo: Andra C Taylor Jr